Comics As History Comics As Literature

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Comics as History, Comics as Literature

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Comics as History, Comics as Literature by Annessa Ann Babic Book Resume:

This anthology hosts a collection of essays examining the role of comics as portals for historical and academic content, while keeping the approach on an international market versus the American one.

The Rise and Reason of Comics and Graphic Literature

Comics As History Comics As Literature [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Rise and Reason of Comics and Graphic Literature by Joyce Goggin,Dan Hassler-Forest Book Resume:

These 15 essays investigate comic books and graphic novels, beginning with the early development of these media. The essays also place the work in a cultural context, addressing theory and terminology, adaptations of comic books, the superhero genre, and comic books and graphic novels that deal with history and nonfiction. By addressing the topic from a wide range of perspectives, the book offers readers a nuanced and comprehensive picture of current scholarship in the subject area.

Classics and Comics

Comics As History Comics As Literature [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Classics and Comics by George Kovacs,C. W. Marshall Book Resume:

Since at least 1939, when daily-strip caveman Alley Oop time-traveled to the Trojan War, comics have been drawing (on) material from Greek and Roman myth, literature and history. At times the connection is cosmetic-as perhaps with Wonder Woman's Amazonian heritage-and at times it is almost irrelevant-as with Hercules' starfaring adventures in the 1982 Marvel miniseries. But all of these make implicit or explicit claims about the place of classics in modern literary culture. Classics and Comics is the first book to explore the engagement of classics with the epitome of modern popular literature, the comic book. This volume collects sixteen articles, all specially commissioned for this volume, that look at how classical content is deployed in comics and reconfigured for a modern audience. It opens with a detailed historical introduction surveying the role of classical material in comics since the 1930s. Subsequent chapters cover a broad range of topics, including the incorporation of modern theories of myth into the creation and interpretation of comic books, the appropriation of characters from classical literature and myth, and the reconfiguration of motif into a modern literary medium. Among the well-known comics considered in the collection are Frank Miller's 300 and Sin City, DC Comics' Wonder Woman, Jack Kirby's The Eternals, Neil Gaiman's Sandman, and examples of Japanese manga. The volume also includes an original 12-page "comics-essay," drawn and written by Eisner Award-winning Eric Shanower, creator of the graphic novel series Age of Bronze.

Alternative Comics

Comics As History Comics As Literature [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Alternative Comics by Charles Hatfield Book Resume:

In the 1980s, a sea change occurred in comics. Fueled by Art Spiegel- man and Françoise Mouly's avant-garde anthology Raw and the launch of the Love & Rockets series by Gilbert, Jaime, and Mario Hernandez, the decade saw a deluge of comics that were more autobiographical, emotionally realistic, and experimental than anything seen before. These alternative comics were not the scatological satires of the 1960s underground, nor were they brightly colored newspaper strips or superhero comic books. In Alternative Comics: An Emerging Literature, Charles Hatfield establishes the parameters of alternative comics by closely examining long-form comics, in particular the graphic novel. He argues that these are fundamentally a literary form and offers an extensive critical study of them both as a literary genre and as a cultural phenomenon. Combining sharp-eyed readings and illustrations from particular texts with a larger understanding of the comics as an art form, this book discusses the development of specific genres, such as autobiography and history. Alternative Comics analyzes such seminal works as Spiegelman's Maus, Gilbert Hernandez's Palomar: The Heartbreak Soup Stories, and Justin Green's Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary. Hatfield explores how issues outside of cartooning-the marketplace, production demands, work schedules-can affect the final work. Using Hernandez's Palomar as an example, he shows how serialization may determine the way a cartoonist structures a narrative. In a close look at Maus, Binky Brown, and Harvey Pekar's American Splendor, Hatfield teases out the complications of creating biography and autobiography in a substantially visual medium, and shows how creators approach these issues in radically different ways.

Portraying 9/11

Comics As History Comics As Literature [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Portraying 9/11 by Véronique Bragard,,Christophe Dony,Warren Rosenberg Book Resume:

Commentators and artists attempting to represent the events of September 11, 2001, struggle to create meaning in the face of such powerful experiences. This collection of essays offers critical insights into the discourses that shape the memory of 9/11 in the narrative genres of comics, literature, film, and theatre. It examines historical, political, cultural, and personal meanings of the disaster and its aftermath through critical discussions of Marvel and New Yorker comics, American and British novels, Hollywood films, and the plays of Anne Nelson.

Rediscovering French Science-Fiction in Literature, Film and Comics

Comics As History Comics As Literature [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Rediscovering French Science-Fiction in Literature, Film and Comics by Philippe Mather,Sylvain Rheault Book Resume:

French science-fiction (SF) is as old as the French language. Cyrano de Bergerac wrote about a trip to the moon that was published back in 1657, as did Jules Verne in 1865, this time using hard, scientific facts. The first movie showing a trip to the moon was made by Georges Méliès in 1902. In the comics’ format, Hergé had Tintin walk on the moon in 1954, 15 years before Neil Armstrong. These are just a few of the many unique French contributions to SF that rightly deserve to be better known. One of the purposes of this collection is to introduce French SF to an English-speaking audience. Rediscovering French Science Fiction... first revisits proto science-fiction from authors like Cyrano de Bergerac and Jules Verne, before delving into contemporary science-fiction works from authors such as René Barjavel and Jacques Spitz. A contribution from preeminent SF author Élisabeth Vonarburg, from Québec, helps to understand the constraints and advantages of writing SF in French. A third section is devoted to French SF in movies and graphic novels, media where French creators have been recognized worldwide. This collection explores many aspects of French SF, including the genre’s deep roots in popular culture, the influence of key authors on its historical development, and the form and function of science and fantasy, as well as the impact of films and graphic novels on the public perception of the genre’s nature.

Arresting Development

Comics As History Comics As Literature [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Arresting Development by Christopher Pizzino Book Resume:

Mainstream narratives of the graphic novel’s development describe the form’s “coming of age,” its maturation from pulp infancy to literary adulthood. In Arresting Development, Christopher Pizzino questions these established narratives, arguing that the medium’s history of censorship and marginalization endures in the minds of its present-day readers and, crucially, its authors. Comics and their writers remain burdened by the stigma of literary illegitimacy and the struggles for status that marked their earlier history. Many graphic novelists are intensely aware of both the medium’s troubled past and their own tenuous status in contemporary culture. Arresting Development presents case studies of four key works—Frank Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, Charles Burns’s Black Hole, and Gilbert Hernandez’s Love and Rockets—exploring how their authors engage the problem of comics’ cultural standing. Pizzino illuminates the separation of high and low culture, art and pulp, and sophisticated appreciation and vulgar consumption as continual influences that determine the limits of literature, the status of readers, and the value of the very act of reading.

The Power of Comics

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The Power of Comics by Randy Duncan,Matthew J. Smith Book Resume:

Offers undergraduate students with an understanding of the comics medium and its communication potential. This book deals with comic books and graphic novels. It focuses on comic books because in their longer form they have the potential for complexity of expression.

Dreaming the Graphic Novel

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Dreaming the Graphic Novel by Paul Williams Book Resume:

The term “graphic novel” was first coined in 1964, but it wouldn’t be broadly used until the 1980s, when graphic novels such as Watchmen and Maus achieved commercial success and critical acclaim. What happened in the intervening years, after the graphic novel was conceptualized yet before it was widely recognized? Dreaming the Graphic Novel examines how notions of the graphic novel began to coalesce in the 1970s, a time of great change for American comics, with declining sales of mainstream periodicals, the arrival of specialty comics stores, and (at least initially) a thriving underground comix scene. Surveying the eclectic array of long comics narratives that emerged from this fertile period, Paul Williams investigates many texts that have fallen out of graphic novel history. As he demonstrates, the question of what makes a text a ‘graphic novel’ was the subject of fierce debate among fans, creators, and publishers, inspiring arguments about the literariness of comics that are still taking place among scholars today. Unearthing a treasure trove of fanzines, adverts, and unpublished letters, Dreaming the Graphic Novel gives readers an exciting inside look at a pivotal moment in the art form’s development.

Masters of American Comics

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Masters of American Comics by John Carlin,Paul Karasik,Brian Walker,Stanley Crouch Book Resume:

Presents the work of America's most popular and influential comic artists, and includes critical essays accompanying each artist's drawings.

Comics Studies Here and Now

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Comics Studies Here and Now by Frederick Luis Aldama Book Resume:

Comics Studies Here and Now marks the arrival of comics studies scholarship that no longer feels the need to justify itself within or against other fields of study. The essays herein move us forward, some in their re-diggings into comics history and others by analyzing comics—and all its transmedial and fan-fictional offshoots—on its own terms. Comics Studies stakes the flag of our arrival—the arrival of comics studies as a full-fledged discipline that today and tomorrow excavates, examines, discusses, and analyzes all aspects that make up the resplendent planetary republic of comics. This collection of scholarly essays is a testament to the fact that comic book studies have come into their own as an academic discipline; simply and powerfully moving comic studies forward with their critical excavations and theoretical formulas based on the common sense understanding that comics add to the world as unique, transformative cultural phenomena.

Studying Comics and Graphic Novels

Comics As History Comics As Literature [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Studying Comics and Graphic Novels by Karin Kukkonen Book Resume:

This introduction to studying comics and graphic novels is a structured guide to a popular topic. It deploys new cognitive methods of textual analysis and features activities and exercises throughout. Deploys novel cognitive approaches to analyze the importance of psychological and physical aspects of reader experience Carefully structured to build a sequenced, rounded introduction to the subject Includes study activities, writing exercises, and essay topics throughout Dedicated chapters cover popular sub-genres such as autobiography and literary adaptation

Arguing Comics

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Arguing Comics by Jeet Heer,Kent Worcester Book Resume:

When Art Spiegelman's Maus-a two-part graphic novel about the Holocaust-won a Pulitzer Prize in 1992, comics scholarship grew increasingly popular and notable. The rise of "serious" comics has generated growing levels of interest as scholars, journalists, and public intellectuals continue to explore the history, aesthetics, and semiotics of the comics medium. Yet those who write about the comics often assume analysis of the medium didn't begin until the cultural studies movement was underway. Arguing Comics: Literary Masters on a Popular Medium brings together nearly two dozen essays by major writers and intellectuals who analyzed, embraced, and even attacked comic strips and comic books in the period between the turn of the century and the 1960s. From e. e. cummings, who championed George Herriman's Krazy Kat, to Irving Howe, who fretted about Harold Gray's Little Orphan Annie, this volume shows that comics have provided a key battleground in the culture wars for over a century. With substantive essays by Umberto Eco, Marshall McLuhan, Leslie Fiedler, Gilbert Seldes, Dorothy Parker, Irving Howe, Delmore Schwartz, and others, this anthology shows how all of these writers took up comics-related topics as a point of entry into wider debates over modern art, cultural standards, daily life, and mass communication. Arguing Comics shows how prominent writers from the Jazz Age and the Depression era to the heyday of the New York Intellectuals in the 1950s thought about comics and, by extension, popular culture as a whole.

Comics through Time: A History of Icons, Idols, and Ideas [4 volumes]

Comics As History Comics As Literature [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Comics through Time: A History of Icons, Idols, and Ideas [4 volumes] by M. Keith Booker Book Resume:

Focusing especially on American comic books and graphic novels from the 1930s to the present, this massive four-volume work provides a colorful yet authoritative source on the entire history of the comics medium. • Provides historical context within individual entries that allows readers to grasp the significance of that entry as it relates to the broader history and evolution of comics • Includes coverage of international material to frame the subsets of American and British comics within a global context • Presents information that will appeal and be of use to general readers of comics and supply coverage detailed enough to be of significant value to scholars and teachers working in the field of comics

Graphic History

Comics As History Comics As Literature [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Graphic History by Richard Iadonisi Book Resume:

When it comes to recounting history, issues arise as to whose stories are told and how reliable is the telling. This collection of fourteen essays explores the unique ways in which graphic novels can aid us in addressing those issues while shedding new light on a variety of texts, including those by canonical North American and European writers Art Spiegelman (Maus, In the Shadow of No Towers), Alan Moore (From Hell, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen), Frank Miller (The Dark Knight Returns), Chris Ware (Jimmy Corrigan), Chester Brown (Louis Riel), and Harvey Pekar. Recognizing the global appeal of graphic novels, this collection also provides a fresh look at history seen through the eyes of canonical non-Western writers Marjane Starapi (Persepolis) and Yoshihiro Tatsumi (A Drifting Life) and the highly vexed relationship of the West and the Middle East. The array of contributors (from the fields of art, literature, history, and cultural studies) is matched by the array of theoretical perspectives and by the depth and breadth of subjects, ranging from the sixteenth century voyages of Sebastian Cabot to Jack the Ripper, from the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 to lynching in the early twentieth-century American South, and from post-war Japan to the fall of the Shah in Iran.

Novel Perspectives on German-Language Comics Studies

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Novel Perspectives on German-Language Comics Studies by Lynn M. Kutch Book Resume:

Novel Perspectives on German-Language Comics Studies: History, Pedagogy, Theory is the first English-language anthology to focus on graphic novels and comics from the German-speaking world. Its contributors take innovative historical, pedagogical, and theoretical approaches to reading contemporary German-language comics and, in doing so, demand that the German-language comics tradition, separate from American or Franco-Belgian traditions, be taken seriously at home and abroad.

Girls and Their Comics

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Girls and Their Comics by Jacqueline Danziger-Russell Book Resume:

Discusses the history of the comic book and how it is a powerful medium for expressing the voices of marginalized girls, drawing on testimony from librarians, authors, and readers to analyze the growing interest in comics.

The Routledge Companion to Comics

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The Routledge Companion to Comics by Frank Bramlett,Roy Cook,Aaron Meskin Book Resume:

This cutting-edge handbook brings together an international roster of scholars to examine many facets of comics and graphic novels. Contributor essays provide authoritative, up-to-date overviewsof the major topics and questions within comic studies, offering readers a truly global approach to understanding the field. Essays examine: the history of the temporal, geographical, and formal development of comics, including topics like art comics, manga, comix, and the comics code; issues such as authorship, ethics, adaptation, and translating comics; connections between comics and other artistic media (drawing, caricature, film) as well as the linkages between comics and other academic fields like linguistics and philosophy; new perspectives on comics genres, from funny animal comics to war comics to romance comics and beyond. The Routledge Companion to Comics expertly organizes representative work from a range of disciplines, including media and cultural studies, literature, philosophy, and linguistics. More than an introduction to the study of comics, this book will serve as a crucial reference for anyone interested in pursuing research in the area, guiding students, scholars, and comics fans alike.